Missouri House Rabbit Society - St. Louis
P.O. Box 6362, Chesterfield, Missouri 63006-6362, USA    Phone: 314-995-1457    Email:  mo_hrs@hotmail.com  
This site last updated: 7/18/2017
Click HERE for valuable info on rabbits and to locate a House Rabbit Society chapter in your area.


National Website
HRS is a 501 (c3) all-volunteer, non-profit organization with a dual purpose of rescue and education. Donations are tax - deductible.

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"Happenings"
Our newsletter with bunny tips and fun stuff!
A Bunny Who Refuses Food Is a Bunny In Crisis!       
Click HERE to learn how to deal with this deadly situation.

Spring/Summer is here!  -  Have the Wild Baby Bunnies in Your Yard Really Been Abandoned?
Mother cottontails stay away from the nest so they don't attract predators to their babies.  Mom will normally nurse the babies twice a day around dusk and dawn when the least amount of predators are around.  Do not disturb the nest.

You can check to see if mom is returning by putting several strings across the nest in a tic-tac-toe sort of pattern and then checking it the next day.  If the strings have been moved, then mom is coming back.  She scratches away the covering of the nest while hovering over it and looking like she's just eating grass to fool anyone watching.  The babies nurse from underneath.  She then scratches the covering back over the nest and nonchalantly continues grazing as she moves further away from the nest; again to fool any predator watching.  She doesn't know how to put the strings back into place properly so they'll be all messed up.

You can also tell if mom has been there (if it's necessary to handle the babies,) by looking at their tummies.  If they are wrinkled and empty looking, mom has been lost to a predator or a car, etc.  She normally would not desert her babies.   If the tummies are rounded, then she's still around somewhere.   If the tummies are rounded and you have handled the babies, you can put one tiny drop of vanilla or cologne on their foreheads to confuse the human scent.  If you put too much then the predators and ants will smell them. Baby bunnies have no scent to attract either.  Baby bunnies are normally in the nest for about 4 weeks before going off on their own.

If mother rabbit does not return, do NOT attempt to make them pets. They have different needs than domestic rabbits and generally die in captivity.  Take the babies to Wildlife Rehab Clinic. They have moved to High Ridge at 1864 Little Brennan Road, phone: 636-677-3670.   They have a  good cottontail survival rate.  
Website:  http://www.wild-life-rehab.com/
ATTENTION BUNNY PARENTS:

If you have a bunny in your family and would like more information on rabbit care and behavior, please contact us to set up an orientation on rabbit care and behavior. 

We can promise you information that you never knew.  Even bunny caregivers of 20 years have told us they learned a lot. 

These sessions are provided free on Mon - Thur evenings at 7pm and Saturdays/Sundays at 1pm, but appointments are needed.  

Have a bunny question?  E-mail us at mo_hrs@hotmail.com

~  Summer Heat Hazards for Rabbits  ~

Rabbits can not sweat.  The only way they have to release heat is from the large veins in their ears.  Be VERY careful about exposing rabbits to heat outside, in your home, car etc.  If you must transport your bunny in hot weather, put ice packs in the pet carrier with bunny to help keep cool during trip.    Bunnies quickly die from overheating.

Inside, move bunny crates away from windows and direct sunlight.  Keep bunny in a cooler room.  A room temperature of 80 degrees or above is dangerous for rabbits.  If your A/C breaks down, move bunny to safe, cool, dry basement area until repairs are complete.  If not possible, repeatedly put cold water on your bunny's ears, making sure it doesn't run down into the ear canal.   Have frozen bottles of water ready for this emergency. Put them in with bunny as some rabbits will lie next to the bottles or will straddle them trying to cool down.  You will also need to take his/her temperature periodically and make sure it remains in normal range. HRS can teach you how to do this safely. Email  tomjoygioia@sbcglobal.net  or call 314-995-1457 for info.

Another option is to call your bunny vet or MOHRS to inquire about boarding your bunny in a safer environment until the dangerous situation is over.  Click HERE for our veterinarian page to inquire about emergency boarding.  Email  tomjoygioia@sbcglobal.net  or call 314-995-1457 to inquire about emergency boarding with MOHRS.
                                                                                 

Warm weather concerns : http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/warm-weather.html
                                                                              
Fly Strike -  a life threatening situation:
One of the many reasons rabbits should be "houserabbits", but even bunnies who never go outside can have this happen.  All it takes is one fly to get inside your house.  Learn how to prevent it:  http://www.rabbit.org/journal/2-12/fly-strike.html                                                                  
Wild Rabbits in Hot Weather

During the hot days of summer, wild cottontail bunnies need plenty of water.

You can help by putting out a shallow pie plate of fresh water for them. Put it in a safe, shady spot and keep it filled.  
















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Scroll down further to learn about summer heat hazards for pet bunnies.